Asperger’s Syndrome
The   Asperger’s   Syndrome   is   named   after   Hans   Asperger,   an   Austrian   Psychiatrist,   who first described children with the characteristic in 1944. What is Asperger’s Syndrome? Asperger’s   syndrom   is   a   form   of   Autism   spectrum   disorder   (ASD)   in   which   the   affected person    is    highly    functioning    and    typically    can    be    characterized    by    the    following symptoms: Difficulties with social communication (difficulties understanding nonverbal expression and missing socio-emotional intuition) Autistic thinking (theory of mind, deficits in executive functioning) Autistic perception (often highly sensitive in specific sensual modalities, weak central coherence = tendency to perceive details over wholeness) Tendency for routines and stereotypical, repetitive behavior Different perception and processing of emotions (difficulties to identify, name and regulate one’s own emotions) The   term   ‘Autism   spectrum’   captures   the   fact   that   each   affected   person   shows   a   unique set   of   symptoms.   This   accounts   for   the   big   differences   between   affected   people   despite the same diagnosis.  Assessment / Diagnostics To   date,   there   are   no   clear   biological   markers   or   medicinal   tests   to   diagnose   Autism spectrum   disorder,   like   most   other   mental   illnesses.   Therefore,   the   diagnosis   is   based on   a   clinical   assessment.   Questionnaires   can   provide   valuable   information   and   can   be used   as   screening   tools.   In   addition   to   a   detailed   anamnestic   exploration,   the   diagnosis also    includes    careful    differential    diagnosis.    Asperger's    Syndrome    can    show    multiple overlaps   with   other   mental   illnesses,   such   as   depression,   anxiety,   trauma,   obsessive- compulsive    disorder,    highly    giftedness,    AD(H)D,    schizoid,    dissocial    or    narcissistic personality   disorder.   It   is   also   important   to   distinguish   automated   coping   strategies from   true   symptoms.   For   example,   an   affected   individual   may   very   well   have   learned   to make   eye   contact   and   smile.   This   does   not   yet   mean   that   this   behavior   is   based   on   an intuitive need. A   full   assessment   will   take   about   5-6   sessions   and   includes   a   debriefing   session   and   a detailed   report   that   is   billed   separately.   If   a   partner   is   willing   to   join   for   one   or   two     assessment sessions, that can offer very valuable additional insights.  What are the advantages of getting diagnosed? In   my   opinion,   a   diagnosis   is   only   as   good   as   many   phenomena   in   the   person's   life   it   can explain.    Knowing    about    the    diagnosis    can    therefore    provide    meaning    and    thus orientation.   Knowing   where   you   stand   and   that   you   are   not   alone   with   your   perception of   the   world   may   have   a   relieving   or   connecting   effect.   Unifying   insofar   as   you   no   longer feel like a sole “weird one”, but rather belong to a group, namely that of all Asperger's. Having   a   clear   diagnosis   also   opens   up   opportunities   to   obtain   specialist   information   or seek   support.   Furthermore,   the   diagnosis   can   be   an   official   legitimation   to   be   and   feel different,   not   to   be   misused   as   an   excuse   for   any   abnormal   behavior,   but   as   a   first   step on the way to self-acceptance and self-esteem. Therapy Asperger's   Syndrome   is   a   congenital   constitution   and   cannot   be   "cured"   by   therapy   or medication.   Therapy   is   based   on   the   needs   of   the   affected   person   and   can   include   such topics as: Training of social skills Training    of    self    perception    (emotions,    body    sensations,    all    senses,    thoughts, impulses) How to better deal with stress Improving self-worth and self-acceptance Acquiring    information    about    the    difference    between    Asperger’s    syndrom    and „Neurotypicals“ (=everyone without Autism) Dealing with procrastination and attention problems Dealing with obsessive thoughts or behavioral patterns and rigid routines Getting   your   questions   about   all   kinds   of   topics   answered   (household,   sports, relationships, sex, wor, hobbies, etc.). Any    comorbid    disorders    can    also    be    treated,    e.g.    depression    /    chronic    exhaustion, anxiety,   ADHD   (even   if   there   is   no   full   diagnsis).   Medication   may   be   helpful   for   these diseases and could be administred by a Psychiatrist if needed. Why I like to work with patients with Asperger’s syndrome I    have    experienced    people    with    Asperger's    Syndrome    to    be    reliable,    unobtrusive, interested,   humble,   grateful,   honest   and   direct.   I   appreciate   all   these   features,   maybe because   I   feel   they   describe   me   as   well.   However,   I   am   not   affected   by   Asperger's Syndrome. Links tonyattwood.com.au  autismspeaks.org/what-asperger-syndrome autism.org.uk/about/what-is/asperger.aspx webmd.com/brain/autism/mental-health-aspergers-syndrome#1 autism-society.org/what-is/aspergers-syndrome/ autastic.com autismus.ch/adressen.html  Book recommendations Tony Attwood: "The Complete Guide to Asperger Syndrome” Order book  or any other book by Tony Attwood about the topic Rudy Simone: “Asperger’s on the job: Must-Have Advice for People with Asperger's or High Functioning Autism, and Their Employers, Educators, and Advocates” Order book Susan Moreno: “The Partner's Guide to Asperger Syndrome” Order book Philip Wylie: “Very late diagnosis of Asperger Syndrome” Order book Good list with books about Asperger’s
Practice for psychotherapy & counseling Dr. Phil Stöckli, PhD

Psychotherapeutic practice

Dr. Phil Stöckli, ph.D.

Gemeindestrasse 26 | 8032 Zürich

Tel. 076 282 8885

Learn more about my specializations: Gestalt therapy Trauma therapy Asperger’s syndrom Addiction therapy Expat issues High sensitivity (HSP) EMDR NARM

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Psychotherapeutic practice

Dr. Phil Stöckli , ph.D.

Gemeindestr. 26 | 8032 Zürich

Tel. 076 282 8885

Practice for Psychotherapy Dr. Phil Stöckli, PhD
Asperger’s Syndrome
The   Asperger’s   Syndrome   is   named   after   Hans   Asperger,   an   Austrian Psychiatrist,    who    first    described    children    with    the    characteristic    in 1944. What is Asperger’s Syndrome? Asperger’s   syndrom   is   a   form   of   Autism   spectrum   disorder   (ASD)   in which   the   affected   person   is   highly   functioning   and   typically   can   be characterized by the following symptoms: Difficulties with social communication (difficulties understanding nonverbal expression and missing socio-emotional intuition) Autistic thinking (theory of mind, deficits in executive functioning) Autistic perception (often highly sensitive in specific sensual modalities, weak central coherence = tendency to perceive details over wholeness) Tendency for routines and stereotypical, repetitive behavior Different perception and processing of emotions (difficulties to identify, name and regulate one’s own emotions) The    term    ‘Autism    spectrum’    captures    the    fact    that    each    affected person   shows   a   unique   set   of   symptoms.   This   accounts   for   the   big differences between affected people despite the same diagnosis.  Assessment / Diagnostics To   date,   there   are   no   clear   biological   markers   or   medicinal   tests   to diagnose   Autism   spectrum   disorder,   like   most   other   mental   illnesses. Therefore,     the     diagnosis     is     based     on     a     clinical     assessment. Questionnaires   can   provide   valuable   information   and   can   be   used   as screening   tools.   In   addition   to   a   detailed   anamnestic   exploration,   the diagnosis     also     includes     careful     differential     diagnosis.     Asperger's Syndrome    can    show    multiple    overlaps    with    other    mental    illnesses, such   as   depression,   anxiety,   trauma,   obsessive-compulsive   disorder, highly   giftedness,   AD(H)D,   schizoid,   dissocial   or   narcissistic   personality disorder.     It     is     also     important     to     distinguish     automated     coping strategies   from   true   symptoms.   For   example,   an   affected   individual may   very   well   have   learned   to   make   eye   contact   and   smile.   This   does not yet mean that this behavior is based on an intuitive need. A    full    assessment    will    take    about    5-6    sessions    and    includes    a debriefing   session   and   a   detailed   report   that   is   billed   separately.   If   a partner   is   willing   to   join   for   one   or   two      assessment   sessions,   that   can offer very valuable additional insights.  What are the advantages of getting diagnosed? In   my   opinion,   a   diagnosis   is   only   as   good   as   many   phenomena   in   the person's   life   it   can   explain.   Knowing   about   the   diagnosis   can   therefore provide   meaning   and   thus   orientation.   Knowing   where   you   stand   and that   you   are   not   alone   with   your   perception   of   the   world   may   have   a relieving   or   connecting   effect.   Unifying   insofar   as   you   no   longer   feel like   a   sole   “weird   one”,   but   rather   belong   to   a   group,   namely   that   of   all Asperger's. Having    a    clear    diagnosis    also    opens    up    opportunities    to    obtain specialist   information   or   seek   support.   Furthermore,   the   diagnosis   can be   an   official   legitimation   to   be   and   feel   different,   not   to   be   misused   as an   excuse   for   any   abnormal   behavior,   but   as   a   first   step   on   the   way   to self-acceptance and self-esteem. Therapy Asperger's    Syndrome    is    a    congenital    constitution    and    cannot    be "cured"   by   therapy   or   medication.   Therapy   is   based   on   the   needs   of the affected person and can include such topics as: Training of social skills Training    of    self    perception    (emotions,    body    sensations,    all senses, thoughts, impulses) How to better deal with stress Improving self-worth and self-acceptance Acquiring   information   about   the   difference   between   Asperger’s syndrom and „Neurotypicals“ (=everyone without Autism) Dealing with procrastination and attention problems Dealing   with   obsessive   thoughts   or   behavioral   patterns   and   rigid routines Getting    your    questions    about    all    kinds    of    topics    answered (household, sports, relationships, sex, wor, hobbies, etc.). Any   comorbid   disorders   can   also   be   treated,   e.g.   depression   /   chronic exhaustion,     anxiety,     ADHD     (even     if     there     is     no     full     diagnsis). Medication     may     be     helpful     for     these     diseases     and     could     be administred by a Psychiatrist if needed. Why I like to work with patients with Asperger’s syndrome I   have   experienced   people   with   Asperger's   Syndrome   to   be   reliable, unobtrusive,     interested,     humble,     grateful,     honest     and     direct.     I appreciate   all   these   features,   maybe   because   I   feel   they   describe   me as well. However, I am not affected by Asperger's Syndrome. Links tonyattwood.com.au  autismspeaks.org/what-asperger-syndrome autism.org.uk/about/what-is/asperger.aspx webmd.com/brain/autism/mental-health-aspergers- syndrome#1 autism-society.org/what-is/aspergers-syndrome/ autastic.com autismus.ch/adressen.html  Book recommendations Tony Attwood: "The Complete Guide to Asperger Syndrome” Order book  or any other book by Tony Attwood about the topic Rudy Simone: “Asperger’s on the job: Must-Have Advice for People with Asperger's or High Functioning Autism, and Their Employers, Educators, and Advocates” Order book Susan Moreno: “The Partner's Guide to Asperger Syndrome” Order book Philip Wylie: “Very late diagnosis of Asperger Syndrome” Order book Good list with books about Asperger’s
Learn more about my specializations: Gestalt therapy Trauma therapy Asperger’s syndrom Addiction therapy Expat issues High sensitivity (HSP) EMDR NARM