NARM - Neuro affective relational model
NARM   is   a   new   therapeutic   method   -   as   the   name   suggests   -   combining   the   latest neuroscientific     research     on     self-regulation     with     a     developmental-psychodynamic background.   Founder   Laurence   Heller   has   been   a   trainer   in   Somatic   Experiencing   (SE) and   long   time   associate   of   Peter   Levine,   before   developing   his   own   approach,   NARM,   as an extension of SE. What makes NARM so unique? NARM   combines   the   bottom-up   approach   of   SE   and   body   therapy   with   the   top- down   approach   of   Psychotherapy.   In   other   words,   it   combines   techniques   of   body therapy and talk therapy and brings the two directions together. NARM is resource-oriented rather than symptom-oriented. NARM promotes autonomy and self-regulation rather than regression. NARM    focuses    (like    Gestalt    therapy)    on    the    Here    and    Now,    the    therapeutic relationship,   keeping   the   relevant   developmental   perspective   in   sight.   In   other words,    NARM    combines    elements    of    Gestalt    therapy    with    elements    of    the psychoanalytical theory. NARM   focuses   on   inner   conflicts   and   relational   issues   (such   as   psychoanalytic therapy) and combines it with a body centered approach (bottom-up). NARM   builds   on   the   fundamental   insights   of   Peter   Levine   on   the   regulation   of   the nervous system. The patient learns to regulate his nervous system himself. Which methods have influenced NARM? NARM   did   not   reinvent   the   wheel   but   has   brought   together   aspects   of   the   following therapeutic methods: "Somatic Experiencing" (bottom-up-approach, “felt sense”, sensory awareness, techniques for self-regulation) Psychoanalytic therapy (Psychoanalytic understanding of inner conflicts, interpersonal dynamic, transference) Body therapies (Developmental phases, resp. character typology of Reich, Lowen) Gestalt therapy (Phenomenology, Focus on the Here & Now) Cognitive Behavioral therapy /CBT (cognitive bias, top-down-approach) Affective Neurosciences (Polyvagal theory, Porges) Esoteric approaches (Vipassana meditation technique, Eckhard Tolle, and others) NARM in action NARM   is   a   subtle   approach,   where   the   patient   determines   direction,   pace   and depth of what is happening. Mindfulness plays a central role in NARM. NARM    focuses    on    learning    self-regulation    techniques.    The    therapist    will    be mirroring   visible   changes   of   your   nervous   system   to   you.   This   will   help   you   to develop a better sense of your own system’s reactions. Basic assumptions of NARM The    approach    is    a    humanistic    one:    the    needs    of    the    client    are    central.    The therapist   does   not   want   anything   except   supporting   the   patient   in   attaining   his goals. Strong    focus    on    resources:    Once    you    have    access    to    his    own    strength,    your symptoms   will   disappear   on   their   own.   This   is   a   key   difference   to   most   other therapies that focus on symptoms and how to eliminate them. NARM, on the other hand, focuses on the positive, the life force, the energy. Explanation of terms Bottom-up :   From   the   bottom   up,   or   from   the   experience   to   the   concept.   Typical procedure in body therapies. Top-down :    From    top    to    bottom,    or    from    the    concept    to    the    body.    Preferred approach in talking therapies. Regressive   approach :   the   client   is   going   back   in   time   and   re-living   feelings   of   his early chilhood, in order to gain new experiences. Anti-regressive   approach    (as   practiced   in   NARM):   The   client   retains   control   and perspective of the current adult self, looking at the past from a safe distance. The   Polyvagal   theory   by   Stephen   Porges    explores   the   relationship   between   social behavior and the nervous system. Developmental   trauma :   unfortunately   a   confusing   term,   because   it   does   not   refer to   a   trauma   in   the   traditional   sense   (not   a   PTSD).   Instead,   it   characterizes   all learned   childhood   adjustment   patterns,   whether   pathological   or   not.   The   term developmental trauma is also not a recognized diagnosis. Five developmental themes There    are    five    key    resources    and    related    developmental    life    themes    that    have    a profound   impact   on   how   we   can   focus   on   ourselves   and   on   others   in   the   present moment: Contact.   We   feel   like   we   belong   to   this   world.   We   are   in   contact   with   our   body   and   our emotions and are capable of sustaining meaningful relationships with others. Needs.   We   know   what   we   need   and   are   able   to   approach   others   when   we   need   their support and proximity. We are able to enjoy the qualities of life. Trust.   We   have   an   inherent   self-confidence   and   trust   others.   We   feel   secure   enough   to allow and rely on healthy depending relationships. Autonomy.    We   are   able   to   say   “No”   and   set   clear   boundaries   towards   others.   We   are capable to express our thouhgts without feeling guilty or afraid. Love.   Our   heart   is   open   and   our   nervous   system   in   balance,   which   supports   loving relationships and healthy sexuality. As   long   as   these   five   basic   needs   are   met,   we   remain   in   flow   and   in   good   contact   with ourselves.   We   encounter   our   environment   with   a   sense   of   security   and   confidence.   We feel   centered   and   experience   a   certain   extension.   To   the   extent   that   these   basic   needs are   not   taken   care   of,   we   develop   certain   survival   or   compensational   strategies    to   cope with the lack of contact and with the the disrupted regulation. Links and literature on NARM Laurence Heller: “Healing devlopmental trauma - How Early Trauma Affects Self- Regulation, Self-Image, and the Capacity for Relationship” Order first edition      Order revised & extended edition Introduction from founder Dr. Laurence Heller
Practice for psychotherapy & counseling Dr. Phil Stöckli, PhD

Psychotherapeutic practice

Dr. Phil Stöckli, ph.D.

Gemeindestrasse 26 | 8032 Zürich

Tel. 076 282 8885

Learn more about my specializations: Gestalt therapy Trauma therapy Asperger’s syndrom Addiction therapy Expat issues High sensitivity (HSP) EMDR NARM
NARM founder Dr. Larry Heller

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Psychotherapeutic practice

Dr. Phil Stöckli , ph.D.

Gemeindestr. 26 | 8032 Zürich

Tel. 076 282 8885

Practice for Psychotherapy Dr. Phil Stöckli, PhD
NARM - Neuro affective relational model
NARM   is   a   new   therapeutic   method -   as   the   name   suggests   -   combining the    latest    neuroscientific    research on          self-regulation          with          a   background.       Founder       Laurence Heller   has   been   a   trainer   in   Somatic Experiencing     (SE)     and     long     time associate    of    Peter    Levine,    before developing   his   own   approach,   NARM,   as   an   extension   of Somatic Experiencing. What makes NARM so unique? NARM   combines   the   bottom-up   approach   of   SE   and body     therapy     with     the     top-down     approach     of Psychotherapy.      In      other      words,      it      combines techniques   of   body   therapy   and   talk   therapy   and brings the two directions together. NARM    is    resource-oriented    rather    than    symptom- oriented. NARM     promotes     autonomy     and     self-regulation rather than regression. NARM   focuses   (like   Gestalt   therapy)   on   the   Here   and Now,     the     therapeutic     relationship,     keeping     the relevant     developmental     perspective     in     sight.     In other   words,   NARM   combines   elements   of   Gestalt therapy     with     elements     of     the     psychoanalytical theory. NARM    focuses    on    inner    conflicts    and    relational issues      (such      as      psychoanalytic      therapy)      and combines     it     with     a     body     centered     approach (bottom-up). NARM   builds   on   the   fundamental   insights   of   Peter Levine   on   the   regulation   of   the   nervous   system.   The patient     learns     to     regulate     his     nervous     system himself. Which methods have influenced NARM? NARM    did    not    reinvent    the    wheel    but    has    brought together aspects of the following therapeutic methods: "Somatic Experiencing" (bottom-up-approach, “felt sense”, sensory awareness, techniques for self- regulation) Psychoanalytic therapy (Psychoanalytic understanding of inner conflicts, interpersonal dynamic, transference) Body therapies (Developmental phases, resp. character typology by Reich, Lowen) Gestalt therapy (Phenomenology, Focus on the Here & Now) Cognitive Behavioral therapy /CBT (cognitive bias, top-down-approach) Affective Neurosciences (Polyvagal theory: Porges) Esoteric approaches (Vipassana meditation technique, Eckhard Tolle, and others) NARM in action NARM    is    a    subtle    approach,    where    the    patient determines    direction,    pace    and    depth    of    what    is happening. Mindfulness plays a central role in NARM. NARM       focuses       on       learning       self-regulation techniques.   The   therapist   will   be   mirroring   visible changes   of   your   nervous   system   to   you.   This   will help    you    to    develop    a    better    sense    of    your    own system’s reactions. Basic assumptions of NARM The   approach   is   a   humanistic   one:   the   needs   of   the client    are    central.    The    therapist    does    not    want anything   except   supporting   the   patient   in   attaining his goals. Strong   focus   on   resources:   Once   you   have   access   to his   own   strength,   your   symptoms   will   disappear   on their   own.   This   is   a   key   difference   to   most   other therapies    that    focus    on    symptoms    and    how    to eliminate them. NARM,   on   the   other   hand,   focuses   on   the   positive, the life force, the energy. Explanation of terms Bottom-up :     From     the     bottom     up,     or     from     the experience    to    the    concept.    Typical    procedure    in body therapies. Top-down :   From   top   to   bottom,   or   from   the   concept to      the      body.      Preferred      approach      in      talking therapies. Regressive   approach :   the   client   is   going   back   in   time and   re-living   feelings   of   his   early   chilhood,   in   order to gain new experiences. Anti-regressive   approach    (as   practiced   in   NARM):   The client   retains   control   and   perspective   of   the   current adult self, looking at the past from a safe distance. The   Polyvagal   theory   by   Stephen   Porges    explores   the relationship     between     social     behavior     and     the nervous system. Developmental    trauma :    unfortunately    a    confusing term,   because   it   does   not   refer   to   a   trauma   in   the traditional      sense      (not      a      PTSD).      Instead,      it characterizes     all     learned     childhood     adjustment patterns,    whether    pathological    or    not.    The    term developmental    trauma    is    also    not    a    recognized diagnosis. Five developmental themes There   are   five   key   resources   and   related   developmental life   themes   that   have   a   profound   impact   on   how   we   can focus on ourselves and on others in the present moment: Contact.   We   feel   like   we   belong   to   this   world.   We   are   in contact   with   our   body   and   our   emotions   and   are   capable of sustaining meaningful relationships with others. Needs.   We   know   what   we   need   and   are   able   to   approach others   when   we   need   their   support   and   proximity.   We are able to enjoy the qualities of life. Trust.    We    have    an    inherent    self-confidence    and    trust others.    We    feel    secure    enough    to    allow    and    rely    on healthy depending relationships. Autonomy.     We    are    able    to    say    “No”    and    set    clear boundaries   towards   others.   We   are   capable   to   express our thouhgts without feeling guilty or afraid. Love.    Our    heart    is    open    and    our    nervous    system    in balance,   which   supports   loving   relationships   and   healthy sexuality. As   long   as   these   five   basic   needs   are   met,   we   remain   in flow   and   in   good   contact   with   ourselves.   We   encounter our   environment   with   a   sense   of   security   and   confidence. We   feel   centered   and   experience   a   certain   extension.   To the   extent   that   these   basic   needs   are   not   taken   care   of, we   develop   certain   survival   or   compensational   strategies    to cope   with   the   lack   of   contact   and   with   the   the   disrupted regulation. Links and literature on NARM Laurence Heller: “Healing devlopmental trauma - How Early Trauma Affects Self-Regulation, Self- Image, and the Capacity for Relationship” Order first edition   Revised & extended edition Introduction from founder Dr. Laurence Heller
Learn more about my specializations: Gestalt therapy Trauma therapy Asperger’s syndrom Addiction therapy Expat issues High sensitivity (HSP) EMDR NARM